Conference Programme

Collecting, Curating, Assembling: New Approaches to the Archive in the Middle Ages

13-14 September 2019

University of St Andrews, School of Art History, and SAIMS

 

Friday 13 September  [Venue: Napier Reading Room, Martyrs Kirk, North Street]]

14:00 Emily Savage: word of welcome

14:15 Rachel Hart (University of St Andrews Library, Special Collections): “The surviving evidence of medieval collecting, curating and assembling to be found in the Library of the University of St Andrews”

15:00-16:00: Handling session in Special Collections with Rachel Hart

17:15: Keynote lecture: Erik Inglis (Oberlin College) [Venue: School 3 on the Quad]:  “History in the Making: Categories, Techniques and Chronology in Church Collections, c. 800-1300”

18:30: Conference dinner [Venue TBA]

 

Saturday 14 Sept [Venue for all sessions: Parliament Hall, South Street]

8:30-9: Coffee

9:00-10:45 Morning session  1: Relics and reliquaries – Chair: Kate Rudy

Juliette Calvarin (Harvard University): “Afterlives of Funeral Palls in the Sacristy (St. Thomas’, Prague, c. 1410)”

Ashley West (Temple University): “Heiltumsbücher and Artistic Authority in an Early Visual Archive”

Sarina Kursteiner (Columbia University): “Notarial Acts as Sacred Matter: Bolognese Notaries and their Images in the Archive, 1290-1303”

10:45-11: Coffee and comfort break

11:00-12:45 Morning session  2: Treasuries – Chair: Emily Savage

Elizabeth Mattison (University of Toronto): “Reflecting a Golden Age: The Material Composition of History in the Treasuries of the Late Medieval Maasland”

Marta Simões & Joana Antunes (CEAACP-GEMA, University of Coimbra): “Reading the Space, Listing the Riches: The Old Cathedral of Coimbra and its Medieval Inventories”

Zachary Stewart (Texas A&M University): “The St Peter Mancroft Inventory: Register, Record, Teaching Resource”

12:45- 2:00 Lunch

14:00-15:45: Afternoon session 1: Manuscripts as Archives – Chair: Julian Luxford

Kathleen Wilson Ruffo (Royal Ontario Museum): “Curating Cultural Capital: A little-known Dutch Psalter as Diplomatic Archive”

Shannon Wearing (UCLA): “The ‘Eternal Memory of Great Things’: Illustrated Secular Cartularies of the Twelfth Century,from Bavaria to Barcelona”

Orly Amit (Tel Aviv University): “Appropriating the Archive: Promoting Legitimacy and Shaping Historical Memory through the Library of John of Lancaster, Duke of Bedford”

15:45-16:00 Coffee and comfort break

16:00-17:45: Afternoon session 2: Storing the Archive Chair: Rachel Hart

Diego Belmonte-Fernandez (Universidad de Sevilla): “Collecting, curating and remembering in the Cathedral of Seville: a portable written archive from the fifteenth century”

Rafael Ceballos-Roa & María del Carmen Rodríguez-López (Universidad de León): “The B-side of the parchment: two medieval monastic archives from the kingdom of León”

Amélie Marineau-Pelletier (University of Ottawa and École des hautes études en sciences sociales): “The Locus Credibilis and the Making of Urban Authority: Preserving the Written Word in Metz (14th-15th Centuries)”

Ending around 18:00 

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CALL FOR PAPERS

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Reliquary diptych, late 14th century, Italian. (Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of J. Pierpont Morgan, 1917. 17.190.982)

The School of Art History, SAIMS and Special Collections Division at the University of St Andrews are pleased to announce an upcoming two-day conference on the archive in medieval art and thought.

The word archive suggests the acts of taxonomy and conservation, but also interpretation and regulation. Its etymology traces back to the Greek arkheion, thus highlighting the political nature of the physical archive and the act of archiving itself. The medieval world maintained this sense of privileged access. Isidore of Seville connected the Latin word archivium with arca, strongbox, and arcanum, mystery. But the term was malleable, referring to collections of various goods and treasures, not just of parchment records and registers. And yet, Michael Clanchy has argued that the medieval mind did not always distinguish between the library and the archive, as we do today.

The organisers therefore invite proposals on the theme of the expanded medieval archive, as it relates to art and material culture. What can medieval collections, compilations, and assemblages of material things tell us about the accumulation of knowledge and the preservation of memory? How is the archive manipulated to fit political or social agendas, and by whom? What are the limits of the medieval archive? Paper topics and themes may include, though are not limited to:

  • Records or inventories of collections, secular, civic, and ecclesiastical;
  • The archive as a physical object or visual record, including books and manuscripts, buildings, reliquaries, etc.;
  • The accretive nature of written testimony in the form of: chronicles, herbals, visitations, necrologies, inscriptions and tituli;
  • Time, writing history through the material, and collapsing temporalities;
  • The creation and perpetuation of memory, identity, and authority;
  • The accumulation and transmission of cultural or familial knowledge via material culture;
  • The politics of preservation, documentation, and display in the medieval world, and of the medieval in the modern world.

Collecting, Curating, Assembling: New Approaches to the Archive in the Middle Ages will take place 13–14 September 2019 in St Andrews, Scotland. Professor Erik Inglis (Oberlin College) will deliver the keynote. The organisers intend to publish the conference proceedings as an edited volume.

All papers must be no more than 30 minutes maxmimum. Please submit a 250 word abstract and title by 15 February 2019. Prof Julian Luxford, Prof Kathryn Rudy, and Dr Emily Savage, along with Senior Archivist Rachel Hart, warmly welcome all submissions and queries at medievalarchive@st-andrews.ac.uk.